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Monday
Feb102014

Covering your Assets

I could really use this technology. I lose my keys all the time. RFID tracking allows manufacturers and businesses to locate and track their assets during the manufacturing process, in transit and in storage or inventory.

I decided to keep things simple in this illustration, showing location in different context through the supply chain. I used an isometric perspective so that the message wouldn't get lost in the details. I have worked with art diretor Roy Comiskey on a number of tech-related articles, and I always enjoy the challenge of bringing new elements to the work.

Here's the piece in the final layout.

Thursday
Jan232014

Science of the Times

We live in an age of uncertainty. I illustrated this article for the New York Times Science section this past week for a new column by George Johnson called Raw Data.

New Truths That Only One Can See

From the article:

Since 1955, The Journal of Irreproducible Results has offered “spoofs, parodies, whimsies, burlesques, lampoons and satires” about life in the laboratory. Among its greatest hits: “Acoustic Oscillations in Jell-O, With and Without Fruit, Subjected to Varying Levels of Stress” and “Utilizing Infinite Loops to Compute an Approximate Value of Infinity.” The good-natured jibes are a backhanded celebration of science. What really goes on in the lab is, by implication, of a loftier, more serious nature.

It has been jarring to learn in recent years that a reproducible result may actually be the rarest of birds. Replication, the ability of another lab to reproduce a finding, is the gold standard of science, reassurance that you have discovered something true. But that is getting harder all the time. With the most accessible truths already discovered, what remains are often subtle effects, some so delicate that they can be conjured up only under ideal circumstances, using highly specialized techniques.

It's no laughing matter, and it has implications for research and development in the future. It's a great read, take the time to read the rest of the article.

Over the past few years it feels that the foundations of so many different things have been rattled. It's been a rough period, personally, and I know it has for a lot of folks everywhere. Now that the new year is here, and spring is coming soon, I feel a bit of optimism. I can say this with certainty: I am very happy to have worked on this. Thanks to Peter Morance at the Times for this one!

 

Wednesday
Jan082014

Society of Illustrators: Annual Show

Illustrators 56 opens Friday at the Society of Illustrators in New York City.

The show is on display January 7 through February 1. I am so pleased and proud to be a part of this show, this is the second consecutive year that I have been included. I wish I could be there to see all of the work, it is a jaw-dropping collection of the best in illustration. Congrats to the Medal winners Dave Plunkert, Melinda Beck and Sarah Jacoby.
The exhibition covers Institutional, Advertising, Uncommissioned, and Moving Image Categories.
This year marks my 25th anniversary in the biz. Looks to be a great way to start the year. If you are in NYC this month, check out the show: 128 East 63rd Street (between Park and Lexington Avenues).
(Framed prints of this piece are available)

 

Monday
Jan062014

Digital Sketchbook

Here's a few recent experimental pieces from my digital sketchbook.

I have an account over on Tumblr, I will be posting these and more on an ongoing basis.

Reconstructive:


 

Underwater:

Shiver:

 

 

 

Sunday
Nov172013

Machines making Machines

 

 I like to dabble in collage, building my own imaginary machines. I collect a lot of old technical catalogues and manuals, and see anthropomorphic images in the diagrams and objects. I don't keep a sketchbook, but I have a lot of open illustrator files, where I create new combinations and characters.


There is something fascinating about the click and whirr of analog technology. Springs, flywheels, gears and levers. A ticking clockwork or adding machine. There is also a romance built into fiction along the lines of H. G. Wells. I don't have the attention span to assemble and repurpose old machines, but I do like the aesthetic, and have dabbled with it in my Mecanismos series. These images are always evolving and have taken on a life of their own.

It's fun to take a technical story and incorporate these robots into the illustration. Here's a recent assignment for the Christian Science Monitor, about human error and mistakes made by officials in sports. Should we replace humans with machines in order to get the call right? Is it foolproof? Will it improve the game? It's your call.

 

 

Recent assignment for Hemispheres magazine above, about designers repurposing our modern technology with a steampunk aesthetic. Juicy topic!  Thanks to art director Claire Eckstrom, she was great to work with.

 

'Your worship is your furnaces

Which, like old idols, lost obscenes,

Have molten bowels, your visions is

Machines for making more machines.'

     - Gordon Bottomley (1912)